Palm Images

 

Palm Images

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November 2011
The Malaysian palm oil industry supports environmentally-friendly practices for example palm oil mills actively use technologies to trap methane. A picture above shows methane-filled storage tanks owned by a palm mill operator.

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October 2011
Two value-added products that can be derived from oil palm’s biomass are fiber and pulp, which are used to produce medium-density fiberboard and paper, respectively. The picture above shows fiber and pulp derived from oil palm’s empty fruit bunches (EFBs).

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September 2011
Empty fruit bunches have several useful applications. They can either be used as fuel in the palm oil mill; further processed to produce fibers or simply recycled back to the soil. All these applications add value to the industry.

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August 2011
Recycling is common within the palm oil industry. It helps save the environment and the use of inorganic fertilizers. Here a worker is seen recycling nutrient-rich palm oil mill effluent (POME) back to the soil.

July 2011
An oil palm field is an ecosystem of its own. Within the plantation, a variety of creatures can be easily identified. This bee was captured on a flower of cassia cobanensis, a beneficial flowering plant commonly planted in oil palm plantations.

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June 2011
Quality control is important to ensure Malaysia produces only palm oil of high quality. This includes scheduled checks for diseases in oil palm fields. Here a research officer is seen getting feedback on the conditions of the oil palm trees from a group of plantation workers.

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May 2011
The Malaysian palm oil industry is embarking on mechanization to improve productivity. One example shown here is a motorised cutter used for harvesting fresh food bunches. This cutter speeds up harvesting process tremendously and saves on labour force.

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April 2011
At the nursery, the Tenera seeds are cultivated in polibags and cared for every day until it reaches 36 months. Those that show abnormalities during this period are discarded. This practice ensures that only the correct seedlings are finally planted in the field.

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March 2011
After pollination of Dura and Pisifera flowers, Tenera seeds are produced. The seeds are then processed and carefully selected for breeding. Only quality Tenera seeds finally make way to the nursery.

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February 2011
The introduction of an insect called ‘weavil’ across oil palm plantations effectively increases the rate of pollination, resulting in improved production of fresh fruit bunches.

 
more images at mpoc.org.my
 

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